Types of Athletes

Continuing with the theme of how very different my two paintasauruses are, I’d like to get your advice on some more nuanced coaching of my very different athletes.

I had a fantastic lesson on Louie last Tuesday night and I think I can mostly attribute it to me coming in hot with some energy and a very can-do attitude. I don’t know why I was in this mood but it worked super well with how Louie was feeling that particular night and we had a great ride. Louie is a very interesting ride for me and I think he’s my ideal kind of ride. We are actually a lot alike. He has this internal switch where he can go from relaxed, pokey, bombproof, toddle around on a loose rein babysitter to light, responsive, tuned in, fancy (draft cross fancy) athletic partner. You can have whichever horse you want that day if you know how to flip the switch.

Louie is like a car with a sticky shifter with a strong preference toward staying in first gear. When I find myself getting frustrated with his goofy evasions or general laziness I have to remind myself that we are literally the same type of athlete. I used to pull all kinds of shit to get out of running or fitness tests. I always told myself that I could play smarter and achieve the same success with less effort and, for the most part, I did. Well, here I am being burned by the exact same thought process…I just have to laugh. Just like sometimes my coaches had to get tough on me or creative on me to get max output, I have to do that for Louie. The silver lining is that we are both the type of athlete that is usually worth this extra effort because the resulting performance is really something. Is it a shame that sometimes talented individuals are not born with the work ethic and internal motivation to achieve their own max potential? Sure it is. But that doesn’t mean it can’t be coaxed out of them by someone else willing to put in that effort. Some coaches can’t or won’t do that and they write off these athletes as lazy, soft, and not worth the effort. They’d rather coach a team of athletes that try their best any day. That’s a decision coaches have made on me all of my life. It’s a spectrum, too, it’s not all or nothing. A lazy but talented athlete can still have an incredible amount of grit, it’s just buried in there a little deeper.

This post was going to be a lesson recap and it is quickly veering off into sports psychology territory. I’m sorry, read on if you like! I have the unique experience of simultaneously riding these very different athletes and it is exposing many parts of my personality to me that I haven’t really thought about in quite awhile. The talent vs effort argument is as old as time and sure won’t be discussed in full in this simple post. I like to think I am the coach that would put the extra effort in for the type of athlete that needed it. I think I even prefer to coach this type of athlete. It’s not right or wrong- it’s one way of doing things- a personal strategy.

I look at Harley and I feel like he is the max effort guy. The one who gives 110% every time. But EquiNovice, isn’t THAT what you want?? That’s awesome! It is, or rather it CAN be. Sometimes he feels a little bit too much like Rudy. Go watch that movie if you haven’t, it’s a valuable pop-culture reference if nothing else. Rudy gets a happy ending and is finally rewarded for putting in the effort despite the various challenges he faces. For every talented, lazy athlete, there is a Rudy or some kind of iteration that falls more on the effort side of the spectrum. That’s not to say Harley isn’t talented, he’s arguably more talented than Louie, it’s more of an effort in the right direction issue, I think. Coaching this type of athlete requires different methods. I am personally less familiar with helping this type of athlete achieve their success but I would imagine it is much more about thoughtful channeling than harnessing.

One thing is pretty clear, you can’t try to make either one of these types of athletes into the other. You will fail and waste so much effort, time, and emotional resources trying.

Being much more comfortable understanding my own tendencies, I know I am failing Harley in many ways because I am trying and learning to be a good coach for him, but I easily make big mistakes and get frustrated trying to understand what makes him tick. In my head, I see this:

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To me, his evasions are in the form of bulldozing off in a million different directions with all the best intentions. I quickly run out of tools to coach this because in dealing with this much more frenetic type of personality I want to yell “Just STOP for a damn second!”  “Think!” and that is exactly the wrong way to help him succeed because that’s me trying to make him into something he’s not (but something I understand better). His answer to almost every question I pose is RUN because he truly thinks that might be the correct answer and all I want to do is rein him in. I have to adjust, but I don’t know how.

Those of you with horses more like Harley, help a sister out! Or if you were the type of athlete who always gave 100% tell me about your favorite coaches- how did they help you? What’s your take on the talent vs effort debate? Will one categorically get you farther or is it more about an adjusted development process on either side to get greatness out of both types? Where is your horse on this spectrum?

 

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6 thoughts on “Types of Athletes

  1. Super interesting topic! I liken Harley to those sensitive horses I have trouble riding, or jivving with. I think slow and steady can work really well for them- but I TOTALLY know what you mean when you want to yell “STOP” and just have them think things through a little more. I know that what has worked for me is just slowing myself down. And letting them figure things out on their own a bit. I’ll be interested to see what others have to say!

    • That’s a good point. I would prefer to try for only “purposeful” movement but I think he processes stuff and relaxes through the movement so just sitting up and letting him work through some stuff might be really positive.

  2. I totally relate to this post. Isabel and Charlie are such very very different creatures in how they think, process and react. And actually Isabel’s work ethic was MUCH better (once you learned how to find it haha). So I’m having to do a lot of learning now on how to motivate and reward Charlie so that he keeps trying even when it’s hard.

  3. I’m totally the first person and just like you got out of gym class all the time haha. I ride a horse like Harley. She thrives on praise and knowing she is doing the right thing. If shes struggling with something I bring her back to something she knows and she will relax. I always have to tell myself you can’t do anything in dressage without relaxation!

    • So true. I do think tension is a huge part of the equation. My issue is that he often starts our rides in a bit of a panic and then seems to settle as he works. He may just be the type of horse that would benefit from being lunged briefly before every ride.

  4. Very cool to compare the two horse personalities (and to think about your own). My horse’s different approaches to work/trying new things definitely makes me notice interesting habits and patterns of my own!

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