The Great Escape

Whoops! Sorry I kinda ghosted you guys in November. It’s been busy! I have been doing a lot of traveling and, of course, plenty of riding too.

My trainer continues to ride and take lessons on Harley which is still nice. She doesn’t go out of her way to offer to give ME lessons on him (I haven’t taken a formal lesson this month) but at least she is more forthcoming with feedback from her rides on him that I use to decide what I will work on when I ride him. Changing trainers is tough…but we are doing pretty well, all things considered.

 

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I extended Harley’s clip a little bit, with much less success than my previous attempt. Must have been some beginner’s luck in my favor on that round.

In late October, Harley and his buddies went on a fast-paced tour of the farm and surrounding neighborhood thanks to the antics of one naughty pony barreling nearly over his owner and throwing open the pasture gate. This all occurred during a dressage clinic at my barn which I was auditing at the time. The area’s main trainer was aboard her horse schooling canter pirouettes and before we all knew what was happening she yelled “loose horses!” and we all clambered up from our chairs to close the arena doors in time to block the incoming stampede. My eyes bugged out of my head as I realized that it was MY horse and, since his pasture is quite far from the arena, something very bad must have happened. I swore and fast walked out of the arena through the barn hoping to head them off at the gate and hopefully keep them in an area that could be enclosed. Other barn members had heard the commotion and had already closed the gate. Harley and his herd mates continued to run around like idiots for a few more minutes refusing to be caught until finally Harley let himself be caught by my trainer while I managed to corral his stall buddy and the herd mare. Everyone grabbed a horse and we all walked them back to their pasture to turn them back out where they returned to eating grass and looking at us all doubled over in the driveway like “What?! We didn’t do anything.” It was intense. Thankfully, no people or horses were harmed in the great escape despite the whole herd crossing a fairly busy country road to frolic around the neighbor’s house.

Anyone who read my last post and thought I was being a stick in the mud about the pony tearing down the decorations while taking photos should keep this in mind… manners matter. This was the same pony.

Anyhoo…our barn has recently become a gated-entry facility! We’re so fancy.

 

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I have been continuing to use my theraband off and on while riding. I think it’s a good tool but I don’t want to become reliant on it either.

 

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Sorry all you get are the crummiest screen grabs from low light iPhone videos.

 

I am making a conscious effort while riding to be more aware of my body. Harley and I have fallen into a much more comfortable groove where I don’t have to be so constantly vigilant about external stimuli. He still spooks all the time at the dumbest stuff but I know his triggers and can read and feel his tension better now. I have noticed most recently that he rarely lets my right hip lead. There is plenty of chicken and egg argument going on here because my right hip doesn’t actually ever WANT to lead. Due to all of my knee problems being on the right, I am very weak on that side, too. I have to make a conscious effort to lead with my right hip when I walk so it just makes sense that I am not helping Harley’s left side weakness. This is what I now focus on during most of my rides.

The two very simple exercises that seem to be the most clear in helping me focus on this are: pushing my right hip to lead on a 20m circle to the right while focusing on keeping my weight balanced. The other exercise is leg yielding to the left. It’s important to focus on working the stiff side in both directions and it is so painfully obvious how much attention is required because when I come around the turn on the short side tracking left, I really have to actually think counter bend coming out of that turn or he will throw his shoulder towards the wall the second I ask for a leg yield. Both of these exercise provide some really good, and immediate, physical feedback so I know (even without a trainer) if I am doing it correctly or not.

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I went home to the northland for Thanksgiving and lavished attention upon the two most spoiled creatures in the universe.

 

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And on Thanksgiving Day in the middle of my third cocktail, I received this photo from my trainer.

 

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The cutest.

 

I hope you all had a really nice holiday and got to spend quality time with family, friends, and beloved four-leggers.

swl

 

 

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2 thoughts on “The Great Escape

  1. Oh man that’s scary about the loose horses, glad they were all ok! Glad it was a good holiday too and that riding is going well even without a ton of lessons 😉

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