One Size Fits…None.

I may be jinxing myself by saying this out loud, but I have made several high-priced used tack purchases on Ebay and I have yet to be truly burned. That being said, I have overpaid for items and I have been frustrated by what I felt like were some sizable disclosures that were omitted from descriptions.

You see, Harley and I just recently passed our two-year lease-a-versary which makes this easily my longest term relationship (both human or equine, but that’s a different story). Harley was not my first lease horse but he was my first FULL lease. I never had a reason to own tack and had never even thought about “fit” for several tack items. I understood that bridles and saddles had to fit the horse but learned quickly that very few items are one-size-fits-all if they end up on the horse. A saddle pad is a saddle pad, I thought, you can just buy any style or color you like! Nope. What’s the spine length? What’s the drop? Does it fit your saddle? Does your giant horse make it look like a postage stamp? Is it contoured enough for his shark fin? How did I learn to consider all of these variables? Oh, the hard way… by buying incorrectly sized things.

Harley came to me with a bridle, a sheet, a blanket, and a cooler. Which, was pretty freaking awesome! The only thing I had to get right away was a saddle. It was a tall order. I have posted about it previously. At the time, I thought I had found a good deal but new information and new market situations have since changed my mind. I searched for several weeks to find that ONE used saddle and then I was pretty much stuck buying it. I felt like it fit Harley reasonably well but I never felt like the saddle fit me. I battled for an entire year and half to resolve the issue with various “bandaids” like half pads, riser pads, offset girths, etc and still never felt comfortable.

 

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Doesn’t look too terrible…does it? 

 

A few months ago, Harley once again, spooked and bolted me off during one of our rides in the arena. It has been an issue for us in the past but he hadn’t done that in over a year. It is always some kind of noise that triggers the spook but then it’s as if he feels like the monster is on his back and as soon as he gets it off- he stops and just stands there. No longer afraid of the noise, or spooky corner that triggered the bolt in the first place. He had some moments of mild soreness or lameness that I couldn’t attribute to anything in particular and he also slowly started to become resistant to standing at the mounting block. I tried some things: gave him some time off; upped his calming supplement; worked with him on the ground; had the trainer ride him. Of course, I also did the thing, where I was like, “this wouldn’t happen to a better, skinnier rider so I should probably end my lease and let him retire”.

I became increasingly frustrated that despite the number of lessons I took or rides I gave him, I had so much trouble with my seat. Every ride felt like a battle. It seems fairly obvious to me now, but you know how these things work- it’s never so simple when you’re in the middle of it. It finally hit me that maybe saddle fit was playing a bigger role in all of this than I was willing to admit.

Around this same time I started to see a huge number of used Albion saddles go on the market. Suddenly they were everywhere! Facebook, eBay, used tack sites. These things must trend kind of cyclically, I haven’t heard of people trying to “unload” Albion saddles for any particular reason, but maybe I’m missing something. All I know, is that two years ago when I bought my repaired, base model, MW Albion SLK HH, I had exactly 2 purchase options- the one I bought or a new demo model for around double the price. Now there were choices! Several high head models, different price ranges, different saddle configurations. On Ebay I stumbled across a beautiful used Albion SLK Ultima HH in a wide with 3″ rear gussets- newer, upgraded leather, better condition, and $500 CHEAPER than my old saddle and I started to get ideas…

I took off all of the gadgets and gizmos I had been using to try to force the saddle to fit and I put it on him sans pad. Looking at my saddle perched slightly-crooked on his frame, pommel high, lacking even panel contact- I was sold. I bought the new saddle.

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not horrific

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until you look from the other side

 

The price was so unbelievably good on this new saddle that I thought I could likely even flip it if it didn’t fit Harley. When it arrived it needed a little love- it must have been sitting uncleaned in the sellers tack room for awhile. But once I finished cleaning and conditioning, I knew I had found a hell of a deal. Now, would Harley and I like it?

 

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The new saddle! straight girth, no rear riser

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Long story, short… we LOVE it. 

 

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Harley immediately moved freer and started to offer his back and carry himself during our WARM UP. I was floored. The upgrade Ultima leather is nice and tacky. The larger blocks and deeper seat fit me SO much better and though, I am by no means a great rider, I finally felt comfortable and aligned while riding. I nearly cried. So many emotions. I had no idea that the same model of a saddle could fit a rider so poorly – I thought I had bought the same saddle my trainer had and that I was set. I was completely naive to these tiny details about fit that make such a huge difference. I felt awful that Harley was uncomfortable in it, though I have no way of knowing for how long it has felt this bad to him. My confidence even got a little boost thinking about how many times I have thought- it’s just me- I can’t ride this horse- I can’t even sit normally- we’re never connected. I’m not saying a saddle swap is about to make me ride like a pro, but I am hopeful that I can make even more improvements to my riding now that I am not fighting my own equipment so much. I am so so so happy Harley is more comfortable, too!

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “One Size Fits…None.

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